Scalpel and Prism: Social Science and the Humanities in the Historian’s Toolkit

Zhenhao (Oscar) Yu Historian Marc Bloch argues that young colleagues should not pigeonhole themselves in the category of either social science or humanities. In his view, historians are quintessential scientists because they collaborate with scientists in other fields and incorporate new methodologies into their studies. They use science as a scalpel to dissect dramatic themes such as geological or linguistic changes. In their role as … Continue reading Scalpel and Prism: Social Science and the Humanities in the Historian’s Toolkit

Multifaceted Perceptions of the Murderess in 19th Century Russia   

Krystel von Kumberg History often depicts women as victims rather than as perpetrators of violence. The stereotype of criminals as inherently masculine has dominated the literature. Warped crime data, societal perceptions of women’s domestic roles and theories regarding women’s sexuality have taken their toll in downplaying the significance of female crime. Stephen Frank, Sharon Kowalsky and Ronald LeBlanc’s articles from The Russian Review and Louise … Continue reading Multifaceted Perceptions of the Murderess in 19th Century Russia   

Somebody’s Watching Me: Surveillance and Betrayal in Operation Gold

Sareena Dubey Rockwell’s song “Somebody’s Watching Me” has become somewhat of a Halloween classic. Its eerie sound in the key of C-sharp minor and catchy pop melody make it an enjoyably spooky listen. Rockwell’s lyrics conjure up a particularly suspenseful story rooted in the paranoia of being surveilled. “Somebody’s Watching Me” was released in 1984, a decade marked by espionage and surveillance related to the … Continue reading Somebody’s Watching Me: Surveillance and Betrayal in Operation Gold

A Golden Ticket: Employing Hypothetical Situations and Questions in the History Classroom

Rosie Click I always loved “choose your own adventure” books as a kid—the excitement of picking right, the risk of picking wrong, the seemingly endless possible combinations of choices and variety of satisfying endings. In some of the books, the perfect ending, known as the “Golden Ticket” ending, can only be achieved by choosing the exact correct combination of paths. The history of the “gamebook,” … Continue reading A Golden Ticket: Employing Hypothetical Situations and Questions in the History Classroom

On Sweaters and Military Incompetence: The Crimean War Through the Lens of Fall Fashion

Joshua Downes The arrival of Autumn and the changing weather means it is time to unbox our jackets and sweaters and look for our mittens and boots. Yet as we don our vests and fleeces one might wonder where all these different articles of clothing came from. It is perhaps no surprise that much of modern fashion has its roots in military wear. From trench … Continue reading On Sweaters and Military Incompetence: The Crimean War Through the Lens of Fall Fashion

Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: From Latinidad to Latinidades

João Gabriel Rabello Sodré Latin America is a large and complex region. It comprises various states and peoples, but also a myriad of biomes, geological features, microclimates, among other earthly variations. One may be baffled that a nonstop flight from Los Angeles to São Paulo, Brazil, takes over twelve hours, an hour more than a plane trip to Madrid. The Amazon rainforest covers various countries … Continue reading Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: From Latinidad to Latinidades

Parallels of USSR and US Withdrawals from Afghanistan

Nargis Azaryun  On February 15, 1989, the Soviet Union pulled out of Afghanistan. Over three decades later, on August 31st, 2021, the last United States soldier left Afghanistan. To understand why the USSR and US decided to depart from Afghanistan, it is crucial to learn why they came in the first place. Since its foundation in 1747, Afghanistan has been a battleground for conflicting worldviews. … Continue reading Parallels of USSR and US Withdrawals from Afghanistan

Neo-Tsarist Foreign Policy: From Tsardom to Stardom

Krystel von Kumberg It is important to consider how international security has evolved since Russian Tsardom (1547-1721) and the Russian Empire (1721-1917). Logic would dictate that as new dynamic threats emerge, Russia’s national and foreign security objectives would change, as national and foreign policy largely depend on the staging of the international landscape. However, despite new developments, Putin’s stardom suggests that, on the surface, not … Continue reading Neo-Tsarist Foreign Policy: From Tsardom to Stardom

The Anthropocene Comes to an End: Humans and Nature 

 Zhenhao Yu The Anthropocene is the period of time when humans influence their natural environment in many ways, such as prehistoric agriculture, the Columbian Exchange, the Industrial Revolution, and nuclear power. Although many scholars are debating which historical event marks the beginning of the Anthropocene, I argue that the term Anthropocene itself is problematic in understanding global history, and essentially, the relationship between humans and … Continue reading The Anthropocene Comes to an End: Humans and Nature 

A Window to the Past: How A Political Cartoon Can Help Us Understand Asian Xenophobia in Early 20th Century America

Will Foster In a December 1900 edition of the weekly satirical magazine Judge, US artist Victor Gillam depicted a scene reflective of America’s broader view of China and Chinese people. The image, entitled “Some One Must Back Up,” shows Uncle Sam piloting his “Auto-Truck of Civilization and Trade” across a narrow mountain pathway until he is confronted by a bloody sword wielding Chinese “Boxer” atop … Continue reading A Window to the Past: How A Political Cartoon Can Help Us Understand Asian Xenophobia in Early 20th Century America