Neo-Tsarist Foreign Policy: From Tsardom to Stardom

Krystel von Kumberg It is important to consider how international security has evolved since Russian Tsardom (1547-1721) and the Russian Empire (1721-1917). Logic would dictate that as new dynamic threats emerge, Russia’s national and foreign security objectives would change, as national and foreign policy largely depend on the staging of the international landscape. However, despite new developments, Putin’s stardom suggests that, on the surface, not … Continue reading Neo-Tsarist Foreign Policy: From Tsardom to Stardom

Romance and Nostalgia in the Coffeehouse

Kathleen Walsh On the website for the European Historic Cafés Association, one can find the itinerary for a nostalgic tour of the continent’s historically preserved coffeehouses. The tour spans Western, Central, and Southern Europe, stretching from Greece to Malta, Spain to Denmark. Most of Europe’s historic cafés, however, are within the confines of the former Austro-Hungarian empire—Austria, Czechia, Slovakia, and Hungary—and they project a nostalgia … Continue reading Romance and Nostalgia in the Coffeehouse